Strikehold504th Forums: Operation Market Garden - Strikehold504th Forums

Jump to content

  • (6 Pages)
  • +
  • « First
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6

Operation Market Garden “A Bridge Too Far”?

#61 User is offline   admin 

  • Administrator
  • Group: +Admin
  • Posts: 2,511
  • Joined: 13-August 02

Posted 11 August 2004 - 07:56 PM

I thought I would add some of one of Cornelius Ryan's research to this discussion. It is from then Capt. Carl W. Kappel CO H Co 504th Para INf. Reg. 2/27/68 the originals are kept at Ohio University.

"The overall plan, Kappel felt, left something to be desired particularly where it concerned the British. He knew Col. John Frost, who commanded the 2nd Battalion of the 1st British Parachute Brigade, and he knew "Frost's battalion was a good one- one of the very best." If anyone would get to the bridge in Arnhem, Frost would, they all felt.

The others? "We were pessimistic. They were too far away." but: "When it came to the British armor, we felt better. They were a good outfit. Frankly, though, we would have traded them all for the 2nd Armored Division. I don't know why the 2nd today, but I know he wished it were going to be them. Maybe because of the fights we were always having with them around Fayetteville; we knew they were a tough outfit."

Kappel tells a story to illustrate his lack of confidence in the British. Perhaps to reaffirm it would be a better term.

"On the third night- the night of the day we made the crossing- I was convinced the war was over. I was absolutely sure we had won it by that crossing. My unit had taken a beating and was all torn up, but we were across and held both bridges.

"There was armor all around us and I could not visualize that armor not going through. It seemed to me it was merely a matter of rolling, but they never rolled. They had their reasons, I know, but to our (airborne) way of reasoning they weren't valid. The enemy was behind them sure, but to us it made no difference. If the enemy was in your rear, that was his tough luck because we were in his, too.

"Keep, Cook and I were together that night and we discussed it. We felt our job was done and I'm afraid we were a bit careless about setting up protection around the British; but we expected them to move out, not stay there.

"I did hear a lot of tank motors back on the Nijmegen side and I assumed they were getting ready to cross. I waited for them to come, but they never did. If it had been the 2nd Armored, they would have ran over us to get through."

The British , as he recalls, sent six tanks over that night. They harbored not far from where Kappel had set up his Hq. "I couldn't believe they weren't coming," he says. "I couldn't understand what they were waiting for."
0

#62 User is offline   DOC 

  • Sergeant
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 27
  • Joined: 11-August 04
  • Location:Czech Republic, Prague
  • Interests:Reenactment of 82.nd AB 504pir in Czech Republic

Posted 12 August 2004 - 10:02 AM

Hello. I have eny question about reenactors I heard something about event in Holland some group in holland want make reconstrucion of Market Garden with Dakota planes us soldier and germany soldier to. Please if someone know more send me e mail about that. Thanks.
0

#63 User is offline   Frank 

  • Major
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 814
  • Joined: 16-September 02

Posted 12 August 2004 - 03:32 PM

Hello,

I spoke to Sergeant Albert Clark on the phone, last Tuesday. I will meet him in Nijmegen, as he will come to take part in the 60th Anniversary of Operation Market Garden. He recalled the name of the platoon commander of the 2nd Platoon, A Company during operation Market Garden!!! His name was Lieutenant WHEELER. Wheeler came from California.

Albert wanted to know if John Mortzfeldt was still alive. I had to tell him that he died in 2001. Albert remembered that John was well liked and also in a good mood, even when the officers were hollering at him!

Frank
0

#64 User is offline   DOC 

  • Sergeant
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 27
  • Joined: 11-August 04
  • Location:Czech Republic, Prague
  • Interests:Reenactment of 82.nd AB 504pir in Czech Republic

Posted 12 August 2004 - 04:01 PM

Frank, on Aug 12 2004, 03:32 PM, said:

Hello,

I spoke to Sergeant Albert Clark on the phone, last Tuesday. I will meet him in Nijmegen, as he will come to take part in the 60th Anniversary of Operation Market Garden. He recalled the name of the platoon commander of the 2nd Platoon, A Company during operation Market Garden!!! His name was Lieutenant WHEELER. Wheeler came from California.

Albert wanted to know if John Mortzfeldt was still alive. I had to tell him that he died in 2001. Albert remembered that John was well liked and also in a good mood, even when the officers were hollering at him!

Frank

Hello please let me more details about event in Holland. I am from Czech Republic I will go there with my guys.
0

#65 User is offline   admin 

  • Administrator
  • Group: +Admin
  • Posts: 2,511
  • Joined: 13-August 02

Posted 18 August 2004 - 01:04 AM

Thought I would add this from the Ryan Archive at Ohio University:

This is from some of Gen. Stanislaw Sosabowski's interview he was Commanding Officer of the 1st Polish Brigade. From all accounts he was loved by his men. He has made many of my points in his interview and some others.

http://www.Strikehold504th.com/jim/sosabowski.JPG

http://www.Strikehold504th.com/jim/sosabowski2.JPG
0

#66 User is offline   Frank 

  • Major
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 814
  • Joined: 16-September 02

Posted 10 September 2004 - 05:38 AM

I just heard from Phil Rosenkrantz that James Megellas and his wife shall come to Holland as well. And Fred Baldino has arranged for me to meet Colonel Patrick Donahue of the 504th PIR and a small group of officers and men, who shall represent the current 504 in Nijmegen.

I just can't wait till next week!

:o
0

#67 User is offline   admin 

  • Administrator
  • Group: +Admin
  • Posts: 2,511
  • Joined: 13-August 02

Posted 10 September 2004 - 08:36 AM

Thats great Frank! If you could send a photo of the event.

Regards,

Jim
0

#68 User is offline   smcrane 

  • Sergeant
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 27
  • Joined: 10-December 05
  • Gender:Male

Posted 17 March 2006 - 12:17 PM

I just read through this thread for the first time. I've read several books about airborne operations in WWII. Recently I read "Ridgway's Paratroopers," by Clay Blair. It was published circa 1985. It is a fine book, and very well documented.

He answered two points which were raised earlier in this thread. Gen. Lewis Brereton, the general who commanded the First Allied Airborne Army, was solely responsible for the fact that the troop transport planes flew only one lift per day. He ordered that they only be allowed to fly one lift per day because he thought that they needed that much time to rest and refuel. Blair did a good job of demolishing that argument, in my opinion.

The other statement was that troops under the command of Gen. Kurt Student, who commanded German paratroopers who fought in Market-Garden, captured a complete copy of the Market-Garden plans. Cornelius Ryan reported this in "A Bridge Too Far." Clay Blair said that no other historian has been able to confirm this point. A member of the Arnhem Battle Research Group said that he had researched German records and had been unable to confirm it, either. The story may well be an "urban legend" of Market-Garden
0

#69 User is offline   Frank 

  • Major
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 814
  • Joined: 16-September 02

  Posted 20 April 2006 - 05:05 AM

Order of Battle of the 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment during Operation Market Garden

Made by Frank van Lunteren, April 2006. Please add any missing names or change names if they are not mentioned correctly.

Regimental HQ - Colonel Reuben Tucker
Exec: Lt.-Col. Warren R. Williams
S-1: Captain Louis A. Hauptfleisch
S-2: Captain Fordyce J. Gorham
S-3: Captain Mack C. Shelley
R-4: Captain William A.B. Addison
Regimental Surgeon: Major Ivan J. Roggen
Protestant Chaplain: Capt. Delbert A. Kuehl
Catholic Chaplain: Capt. Edwin J. Kozak

Service Company: Capt. Jack M. Bartley
Parachute Maintenance Company: Capt. Wiley N. Cooper
Regimental HQ Company: Capt. Adam A. Komosa
Regimental Recon Platoon: LT Donald Crooks

1st Battalion - Major William E. Harrison
Exec: Major John T. Berry (originally 509 PIB)
S-1: 1LT George P. Crockett
S-2: 1LT James H. Goethe
S-3: 1LT John N. Pease
S-4: 1Lt George F. Taliaferro
MO: Captain Charles Zirkel
1LT William Magrath

Co A: Capt. Charles W. Duncan
Exec: 1LT John M. Randles
1st Platoon: 2LT Reneau G. Breard
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT George A. Johnson
2nd Platoon: 1LT Joseph G. Wheeler
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT Earl V. Morin
3rd Platoon: 1Lt Robert S. Curier (KIA 21 Sep)
Assist Pltncomm: 2Lt Ernest Walker

Co B: Capt. Thomas C. Helgeson
Exec: 1LT Henry C. Dunavant
1st Platoon:
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT Hewitt
2nd Platoon: 1LT Maurice Marcus
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT James N. Cummings
3rd Platoon: 1LT William A. Meerman
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT Richard Smith

Co C: Capt. Albert E. Milloy
Exec: 1Lt James E. Dunn?
1LT Merriman
1Lt Bruno J. Rolak
3rd Platoon: 2LT Milton L. Baraff

Co HQ: Capt. Roy E. Anderson


2nd Battalion - Major Edward N. Wellems
Exec: Major Colville
S-1: 1LT Chester A. Garrison
S-2: 1LT Lewis P. Fern
S-3: Capt. Herbert H. Norman
S-4: 1Lt Silver?

Co D: Capt. Victor W. Campana
Exec: 1LT Edward Wisniewski (Dow Sep 22, 1944)
2LT Hanz K. Druener
1LT G. Wilfred Jaubert (also a pathfinder)
LT Leonard Greenblatt
1LT John E. Schaeffer

Co E: Capt. Walter S. Van Poyk
1LT John S. Thompson
1Lt Hanford E. Files (KIA)

Co F: Capt. William J. Sweet Jr.
Exec: 1LT Victor W. Campana
1Lt William L. Watson
1LT Martin E. Middleton
LT James Simmons?

Co HQ: Captain Robert J. Cellar?


3rd Battalion - Major Julian A. Cook
Exec: Major Abdallah Zakby (wounded on 21 September 1944 and replaced by Captain Arthur W Ferguson)
S-1: 1Lt Thomas F. Pitt
S-2: 1Lt. Virgil F. Carmichael
S-3: Capt. Henry Keep
S-3: 1Lt Thomas E. Utterbeck
MO: Capt. Hyman D. Shapiro

Co G: Capt. Fred E. Thomas (replaced by James Goethe in October 1944)
Exec: 1Lt. Roy M. Hanna
1st Platoon: 1Lt. Steve Seyebe (KIA 20 September 1944)
2nd Platoon: Lt. Don Graeber
3rd Platoon: 1Lt. Roy M. Purcell

Co H: Capt. Carl W. Kappel
Exec: 1Lt. William H. Preston
1st Platoon: 1Lt Edward H. Sims
Assist Pltncomm: 2Lt Isadore D. Rynkiewicz (POW 17 September 1944)
2nd Platoon: 1LT Richard “Rivers” LaRiviera
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT Joseph Forrestal?
3rd Platoon: 2LT James Megellas
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT Ernest P. Murphy

Co I: Capt. T. Moffat Burriss (WIA 20 September but remained in command)
Exec: 1Lt Robert Blankenship
1st Platoon: Lt. Robert M. Rogers
Assist Pltncomm: 2Lt. Campbell
2nd Platoon: Lt. Harry F. Busby (KIA 20 September 1944)
Assist Pltncomm: Lt. Bernhard Karnap
3rd Platoon: Lieutenant Price
Assist Pltncomm: Lt. Edward W. Kennedy

HQ Co: Capt. W. Stanley Burkholder (WIA 20 September 1944)
Mortar Platoon: 1LT Allen F. McClain
Machine Gun Platoon: 1LT Patrick Collins
0

#70 User is offline   admin 

  • Administrator
  • Group: +Admin
  • Posts: 2,511
  • Joined: 13-August 02

Posted 13 February 2007 - 02:54 AM

This story originally appeared in Stars and Stripes on December 9, 1944.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Mortarmen kept Nijmegen bridge open

In maneuvers these men were laughed at — That was before they started shelling Jerry

By John Christie, Warweek staff writer

REMEMBER the first time you ever saw a mortar? Back in basic or on those never-to-beforgotten torture sessions they call "maneuvers," lots of guys got a big bank out of razzing the mortarmen about their "Fourth of July Cannon." It was a great joke to the doughies, the pick-an'-shovel soldiers and the armored outfits.

It was a great joke — but that was before Sicily and Salerno. It was before Anzio and Omaha. It was long before the hedgerows and the roadblocks and the little fortified heaps of rubble which were French or Belgian, Dutch or German towns.

It was before the Siegfried. It was before the battle of the Nijmegen Bridge. But all that fighting with mortars had paved the way for an action at the bridge which made mortar history.

Only one platoon fought there, but the work of every American mortarman in Europe had contributed something to the tactics they used and the success they achieved.

To be precise about it, the guys to sew up this mortar business consisted of one platoon of the 82nd Airborne. For a full day and night they were artillery, machine gunners, infantry and armor — at least as far as the results they obtained were concerned. Their position was a badly-mauled cemetery, 1,000 yards from the strategically-vital bridge. Their assignment was to cover the bridge with mortar fire to hold it open for the relief of British paratroop units in trouble on the German side of the Waal River in Holland.

They carried out that mission successfully. They did more than that.

They did tricks with their four 81mm. "Fourth of July Cannon" that had never been seen before. These tricks worked. They worked so well that the biggest brass in the business was impressed. Now, the battle tricks of that bunch of mortarmen are being made a part of the regular training to the mortar section of the Infantry School, back at Fort Benning, Ga.

The platoon, under command of 1/ Lt. John L. Cooper, of North Hollywood, Cal., went into position in the cemetery at 4 o'clock on the afternoon of September 19. The enemy had strong positions in a parkway which formed the approach to the bridge. The 2nd battalion's front line was a row of houses facing the park and in one of the houses the mortar platoon had its OP.

The battle for the bridge lasted 24 hours with the mortar platoon playing the decisive role. Although its position was constantly under intense artillery fire that splintered tombstones and churned up bodies, the platoon firing in battery laid down a total of 1,650 rounds.

Battery Fire Effective

"We always fire in battery whenever possible," says Lt. Cooper. "We find it more effective to put four guns on the same target rather than to fire one gun four times. It's easier to control your fire this way and, if it's surprise fire, you give the enemy a much greater wallop because he is robbed of the chance to better his position during the interval between bursts."

When the infantry assault was made on the bridge, the platoon really showed its stuff by laying down a barrage only 50 yards ahead of the advancing paratroopers. It takes experts to do that. According to the book, 100 yards is considered the minimum distance for close mortar support. But when you haven't got the artillery or are in a situation where you can't make use of artillery, mortar support like this can save lives. One of the companies in the assault didn't lose a single man killed or wounded.

"When you're firing close support like this, it's a good idea to level the bubbles on the sight at all times," warns Section Sgt. Harold W. Woltzof, Dearborn, Mich. "It's hard to do I know, but if you're firing fast and don't do it, there is danger that you'll get some dispersion that will cause casualties among your own guys. We had to be careful to do this when we were laying down that barrage at 50 yards because our four guns poured out 200 rounds in five minutes."

Guns Well Dug In

The mortar platoon's 24-hour fire from the graveyard was devastating. When tanks came up to exploit the breakthrough across the bridge, the parkway was littered with more than 200 German bodies and several knocked-out anti-tank guns. Flames from nearby burning buildings lit up the scene long after darkness fell to further emphasize what the mortars had done.

The cemetery had been a hot spot during the 24-hour engagement, but the mortar platoon lost only one man wounded. That's because these veterans are always well dug in.

"In a situation like that have your guns dug in as well as possible," says Corporal John F. Lee of Worcester, Mass. "When we're in a defensive position we like to have our gun in a hole about five feet deep and about six by six in area. It gives two men plenty of room and the gun plenty of traverse."

The loss of only one man in this action is also remarkable in view of the fact that telephone lines had to be repaired 12 times tinder fire. But every man in the platoon can make wire repairs just like every ammo carrier is a trained gunner.

"It's best to use heavy wire, even though it's harder to lay," explains Section Sgt. Joseph Gilhooly of New York City. "We generally lay alternate lines right at the beginning and whenever possible we try to string them overhead so that they won't get damaged by tanks and artillery fire."

Teamwork Pays

The platoon's work at Nijmegen Bridge earned a decoration for each member of the outfit. Once again the success of an important operation pivoted on the ability of this platoon. It had been the same story back in Italy during a vital delaying action on the Votturno River. That time the platoon earned a unit decoration.

But the Nijmegen Bridge action was only one of the platoon's outstanding accomplishments in the Holland campaign. The platoon fired more than 16,000 rounds in the seven weeks of combat. Still more important were some of the battle expedients; like the barrage at 50 yards. .

One of their neatest maneuvers was increasing the range of the mortar 1,300 yards beyond the prescribed limit. This wasn't done for the hell of it, either. It was strictly an invention born of battle necessity. Extra range was needed to cover a vital target and there was no artillery available to do it.

Added Range — Normal Recoil

Here's the way they worked it. They used four heavy increments and two light increments with HE light ammo. That gave the added range without increasing the recoil beyond the safety limits prescribed by Ordnance. Or, in other words, the recoil was no greater than the normal recoil when four heavy increments are used with heavy ammo. "Remember this expedient only applies to light ammo," Lt. Cooper emphasizes. "You can't afford to allow the recoil to increase beyond the prescribed limit because you would not only wreck the gun but endanger the crews."

One day in Holland the platoon had an unusual opportunity to prove its ability to handle mortars in the form of a demonstration for a visiting general. The demonstration, however, did have a useful purpose. It was to cover a patrol going out for prisoners and prisoners were needed badly at the time.

The patrol's objective was an enemy machine-gun position, which was covered by a platoon dug in about 100 yards away. The instructions were for the patrol to move in on the machine-gun position, following a mortar concentration, and get back with prisoners while the fire was being shifted to the platoon.

Heavy Concentration

The mortarmen laid down a four-minute concentration of 200 rounds on the machine-gun position. As soon as the fire was lifted and directed on the enemy platoon, the patrol rushed out, took three prisoners out of their holes and were back in seven minutes. They had found the machine-gun smashed up and resting against the side of a house.

Such proficiency requires plenty of practice and good teamwork. This platoon is strong on both. Now that they've proved themselves, these Joes are frank to admit that months of dry runs are paying off. In other words, they did master what was in the book before they tried their own variations.

The outfit is fortunate that its present first and second gunners have been together a fairly long time. "It should be so you can't get along without each other" says S/Sgt. John P. Jojola, of Isleta, New Mexico, a veteran of all four of the 82nd's missions.

The platoon has strengthened itself by a policy of giving its ammo carriers a chance to serve as gunners as often as possible. "After all, they are the ones who have to serve as gunners when we get casualties," says Lt. Edward Soltanoff of Newark, N.J., assistant platoon leader. "So, when in a defensive position, ammo carriers are given a chance to get some practice. It means that every man in each squad can fire, and when the going is tough the platoon can work in shifts."

In Holland, the platoon in several instances proved itself adept in using the 81-mm. mortar without base plate or bipod. That means firing without use of a sight and the gunner has got to be able to see his target. "My men have gotten on the target in two rounds at 200 yards," reports Lt. Cooper.

A gunner carrying a tube and two ammo carriers frequently went out with patrols and often the mortar was fired in this manner in close support of a company. "It's advisable to fire with no added increments when not using a base plate and biped because, if the charge is too great, your tube might sink in the ground," cautions Sgt. Woltz.

Enemy Equipment Used

Extensive use of captured enemy equipment is SOP with airborne units because of the great difficulty of re-supplying them and the mortar platoon has had considerable experience with the Heinie mortar. They use the Heinie tube and base plate in order to make use of captured ammo and attack their own bipods and sights. "Be careful of that Kraut mortar ammo that has no caps though," cautions Sgt. Gilhooly.

This platoon has learned by long battle experience that effective firing depends a lot on the way you use and take care of your ammo. Cpl. Charles E. Johnson, of Belmar, N.J., a top-notcher in precision firing, calls attention to the importance of putting the shell in the tube carefully. "Instead of just throwing the shell in, you should let it slide down easily and center itself," explains the corporal. "Put it in wobbly and it's apt to come out that way."

"We generally manage to get a dugout made for ammo storage when we're in a defensive position," says Lt. Soltanoff. ''It's really not safe to fire ammo that's wet ... too much risk of getting short rounds." Cautions Cpl. Johnson, "You've got to be careful of this new ammo because the increment come in cellophane wrappers and easily slide off."

Improvise Bore Cleaners

These mortarmen are just as fussy about the care of the weapon itself. The platoon often finds itself without bore cleaners but manages to keep the tubes in good firing condition by swabbing them with a gas-and-oil mix. "It's a damn good field expedient," says Lt. Cooper.

This platoon has proved conclusively that the mortar in the hands of expert gunners is an accurate weapon and can be use as artillery. It frequently fires from a map, especially in night actions.

©Stars and Stripes / www.stripes.com
For reprint permission, e-mail permission@stripes.osd.mil
0

#71 User is offline   Stuay 

  • Sergeant
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 40
  • Joined: 22-September 02

Posted 01 March 2007 - 07:36 PM

I notice that there is no demoliltion platoon listed, but there is a recon platoon. Was the recon platoon in addition the demolition platoon, or did the regiment have a recon platoon instead of the demo platoon?

I notice that some platoons had assistant platoon leaders, while some others did not. Was that the case or is it that they had them, but there names were "lost".



View PostFrank, on Apr 20 2006, 06:05 AM, said:

Order of Battle of the 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment during Operation Market Garden

Made by Frank van Lunteren, April 2006. Please add any missing names or change names if they are not mentioned correctly.

Regimental HQ - Colonel Reuben Tucker
Exec: Lt.-Col. Warren R. Williams
S-1: Captain Louis A. Hauptfleisch
S-2: Captain Fordyce J. Gorham
S-3: Captain Mack C. Shelley
R-4: Captain William A.B. Addison
Regimental Surgeon: Major Ivan J. Roggen
Protestant Chaplain: Capt. Delbert A. Kuehl
Catholic Chaplain: Capt. Edwin J. Kozak

Service Company: Capt. Jack M. Bartley
Parachute Maintenance Company: Capt. Wiley N. Cooper
Regimental HQ Company: Capt. Adam A. Komosa
Regimental Recon Platoon: LT Donald Crooks

1st Battalion - Major William E. Harrison
Exec: Major John T. Berry (originally 509 PIB)
S-1: 1LT George P. Crockett
S-2: 1LT James H. Goethe
S-3: 1LT John N. Pease
S-4: 1Lt George F. Taliaferro
MO: Captain Charles Zirkel
1LT William Magrath

Co A: Capt. Charles W. Duncan
Exec: 1LT John M. Randles
1st Platoon: 2LT Reneau G. Breard
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT George A. Johnson
2nd Platoon: 1LT Joseph G. Wheeler
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT Earl V. Morin
3rd Platoon: 1Lt Robert S. Curier (KIA 21 Sep)
Assist Pltncomm: 2Lt Ernest Walker

Co B: Capt. Thomas C. Helgeson
Exec: 1LT Henry C. Dunavant
1st Platoon:
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT Hewitt
2nd Platoon: 1LT Maurice Marcus
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT James N. Cummings
3rd Platoon: 1LT William A. Meerman
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT Richard Smith

Co C: Capt. Albert E. Milloy
Exec: 1Lt James E. Dunn?
1LT Merriman
1Lt Bruno J. Rolak
3rd Platoon: 2LT Milton L. Baraff

Co HQ: Capt. Roy E. Anderson
2nd Battalion - Major Edward N. Wellems
Exec: Major Colville
S-1: 1LT Chester A. Garrison
S-2: 1LT Lewis P. Fern
S-3: Capt. Herbert H. Norman
S-4: 1Lt Silver?

Co D: Capt. Victor W. Campana
Exec: 1LT Edward Wisniewski (Dow Sep 22, 1944)
2LT Hanz K. Druener
1LT G. Wilfred Jaubert (also a pathfinder)
LT Leonard Greenblatt
1LT John E. Schaeffer

Co E: Capt. Walter S. Van Poyk
1LT John S. Thompson
1Lt Hanford E. Files (KIA)

Co F: Capt. William J. Sweet Jr.
Exec: 1LT Victor W. Campana
1Lt William L. Watson
1LT Martin E. Middleton
LT James Simmons?

Co HQ: Captain Robert J. Cellar?
3rd Battalion - Major Julian A. Cook
Exec: Major Abdallah Zakby (wounded on 21 September 1944 and replaced by Captain Arthur W Ferguson)
S-1: 1Lt Thomas F. Pitt
S-2: 1Lt. Virgil F. Carmichael
S-3: Capt. Henry Keep
S-3: 1Lt Thomas E. Utterbeck
MO: Capt. Hyman D. Shapiro

Co G: Capt. Fred E. Thomas (replaced by James Goethe in October 1944)
Exec: 1Lt. Roy M. Hanna
1st Platoon: 1Lt. Steve Seyebe (KIA 20 September 1944)
2nd Platoon: Lt. Don Graeber
3rd Platoon: 1Lt. Roy M. Purcell

Co H: Capt. Carl W. Kappel
Exec: 1Lt. William H. Preston
1st Platoon: 1Lt Edward H. Sims
Assist Pltncomm: 2Lt Isadore D. Rynkiewicz (POW 17 September 1944)
2nd Platoon: 1LT Richard “Rivers” LaRiviera
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT Joseph Forrestal?
3rd Platoon: 2LT James Megellas
Assist Pltncomm: 2LT Ernest P. Murphy

Co I: Capt. T. Moffat Burriss (WIA 20 September but remained in command)
Exec: 1Lt Robert Blankenship
1st Platoon: Lt. Robert M. Rogers
Assist Pltncomm: 2Lt. Campbell
2nd Platoon: Lt. Harry F. Busby (KIA 20 September 1944)
Assist Pltncomm: Lt. Bernhard Karnap
3rd Platoon: Lieutenant Price
Assist Pltncomm: Lt. Edward W. Kennedy

HQ Co: Capt. W. Stanley Burkholder (WIA 20 September 1944)
Mortar Platoon: 1LT Allen F. McClain
Machine Gun Platoon: 1LT Patrick Collins

0

#72 User is offline   Frank 

  • Major
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 814
  • Joined: 16-September 02

Posted 02 March 2007 - 04:52 AM

Stuart,

Good question. I think there was both a Recon and a demolition platoon. The latter was probably divided in squad and attached to other platoons or companies when needed. A Company had one demolition squad for instance in Hitdorf, led by S/SGT Julius Maneth.

The Order of Battle of the 504th that I posted some years ago is terribly outdated. I will come up with a new one either here or on my own website. Will keep you and others here informed about that. Currently I researching the contribution of the medics in the 504th. How were they composed, who did what, etc.

Frank

P.S. LT Merriman was with the Recon or the Demolition Platoon for some time. I think during the Battle of the Bulge. 1LT Willard J. Hill from LA, CA was the platoon leader of the Demolition Platoon in April 1945. I got that info from Mrs. Doreen Kennedy, who was the fiancee of Corporal Lee Eastman (KIA April 7, 1945)
0

#73 User is offline   Stuay 

  • Sergeant
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 40
  • Joined: 22-September 02

Posted 02 March 2007 - 04:07 PM

Frank:

On other matter, do you know if the rifle platoons in the 504th had 3rd rifle squads during Market Garden -- and/or, if the 82nd A/B Division had 3rd rifle squads in Normandy, for that matter as well? The TO&E's through the one dated August 1994 only authorized two rifle squads and one mortar squad per parachute infantry platoon, and it was not until the December 1944 TO&E that the PIR rifle platoons were authorized a third rifle squad (in addition to the two rifle and one mortar squads). I have heard anectodally, however, that prior to the erd rifle squads were formed prior to their official authorization in the December 1944 TO&E. Can you provide some insight into this?

Thanks,

Stu
0

#74 User is offline   admin 

  • Administrator
  • Group: +Admin
  • Posts: 2,511
  • Joined: 13-August 02

Posted 19 March 2007 - 10:39 AM

My dad was part of the Regimental Recon Platoon and the Regimental Demolition Platoon. You can see some of the names here of the men that belonged to the Recon Platoon up until Anzio. The Recon Platoon was disbanded at Anzio and formed again in England. The Sgt. in charge of Regimental HQ Company was 1st Sgt. Govey Baird from my town he was good pals with my dad and got him his job in England with Demolition after being wounded at Anzio. I believe my dad had some prior training in wire.
0

#75 User is offline   walt e. hughes 

  • Sergeant
  • Group: Veteran of 504th In WW II
  • Posts: 93
  • Joined: 04-December 05
  • Location:Port Jervis NY
  • Interests:Anything Airborne or connected to the Airborne<br />Also anything concerning the tugboat industry past and present. (retired tugboat Captain, NY Harbor, Great Lakes<br />and East Coast)

Posted 19 March 2007 - 04:05 PM

View PostStuay, on Mar 2 2007, 05:07 PM, said:

Frank:

On other matter, do you know if the rifle platoons in the 504th had 3rd rifle squads during Market Garden -- and/or, if the 82nd A/B Division had 3rd rifle squads in Normandy, for that matter as well? The TO&E's through the one dated August 1994 only authorized two rifle squads and one mortar squad per parachute infantry platoon, and it was not until the December 1944 TO&E that the PIR rifle platoons were authorized a third rifle squad (in addition to the two rifle and one mortar squads). I have heard anectodally, however, that prior to the erd rifle squads were formed prior to their official authorization in the December 1944 TO&E. Can you provide some insight into this?

Thanks,

Stu

Stu
I/Co had 3 squads to a platoon and we had 2 30MM Mortar's in the 3rd squad of the first platoon. One of the Mortar mens name was Levi Simmons from Alabama. and i have the other troopers name some where but
cant think of it. It could also have been Red Allen. As far as I know they were the only Mortars in the company, but my memory is not that clear on that
walt e. hughes
0

Share this topic:


  • (6 Pages)
  • +
  • « First
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users